By: Allison Ross, Yellowhammer

There are plenty of areas of debate over exactly how and where the U.S. should spend its foreign aid dollars. But for Mississippian’s in particular — and the entire Gulf Coast region more broadly — the international assistance that flows into cracking down on illegal wildlife trafficking is paying massive dividends, both economically and, perhaps more surprisingly, in terms of national security.

A survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation indicates Americans grossly overestimate the amount the federal government spends on foreign aid.  The average answer was foreign aid accounts for a whopping 31 percent of spending. Fifteen percent of respondents actually thought it represented over half of the U.S. budget.

In reality, according to the Congressional Research Service, it accounts for about 1 percent total when military, economic development and humanitarian efforts are combined.  And it is paying massive dividends for Mississippi.



Here’s how:

First, foreign aid dollars fund multi-nation efforts to combat illegal trade in timber and fish. These illicit practices cost U.S. foresters and fishers billions of dollars in lost revenue every single year by flooding the market and driving down prices.

According to Mississippi State University Extension Service forest products are ranked as the state’s second highest agricultural commodity.  The value of forest products in 2017 was $1.4 billion with over 19.7 million forest acres and about 125,000 forest landowners.  The Mississippi seafood industry also contributes $239.7 million in annual value to the state economy. By cracking down on the black-market trading of timber and fish, our foreign aid dollars are protecting Mississippi jobs.

Second, foreign aid that flows into international conservation efforts, which has enjoyed bipartisan support for decades, helps countries manage their natural resources sustainably. This prevents the scarcity of water, food or forests that often contributes to instability and sparks regional conflicts.

Third, cracking down on illegal wildlife trafficking cuts off a major source of income for armed groups and organizations with terrorist ties throughout the world, many of which pose a direct threat to American interests.

A report by the United Nations and Interpol found that the “illegal wildlife trade worth up to $213 billion a year is funding organized crime, including global terror groups and militias.” Additionally, “the annual trade of up to $100 billion in illegal logging is helping line the pockets of mafia, Islamist extremists and rebel movements, including Somalia’s Al-Qaeda linked terror group al-Shabaab.”

Fortunately, Senator Thad Cochran, who recently retired from the powerful post of Chairman of the Appropriations Committee, has been a staunch supporter of ensuring that resources continue to flow into efforts to combat the illegal trade in timber and fish.  His support did not go unnoticed by leaders in the seafood industry, a major source of economic activity in all Gulf States, including Mississippi.

“We cannot thank Senator Cochran enough,” said Southern Shrimp Alliance Executive Director John Williams after fiscal year 2018 appropriation. “Their extraordinary efforts ensure the survival of the domestic shrimp fishery in the face of what has been an endless stream of illegal shrimp imports.”



Support for foreign assistance and international conservation is smart domestic policy. It protects our economy and cuts off the flow of cash to criminals and terrorists. Sen. Cochran and the bipartisan coalition of lawmakers from whom he has helped rally support deserve recognition and praise for their leadership.