CLARION LEDGER – ‘Good ol’ redneck gathering’: Oxford area campaign event is a Mississippi tradition

The Good Ole Boys and Gals political event in Oxford is a north Mississippi pre-election tradition, often drawing all the top candidates and more than 300 others.Steer past rows of campaign signs and drive through a tunnel of trees, and there it is: Johnny Morgan’s Shop.

In one of Mississippi’s many offbeat political traditions, locals meet at this shed in the woods every campaign season. They eat the barbecue chicken and beans. They slam a couple of free Coors Lights. Then they grill some political candidates one-on-one.

And the political hopefuls do show up, as they have for about 25 years. They hardly have a choice. This is Good Ole Boys and Gals, after all.



On Thursday night, there was Republican Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann, running for lieutenant governor, and his chief rival, Democratic Rep. Jay Hughes. There was current Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves, running for governor, plus fellow Republican Rep. Robert Foster and Democrat Velesha P. Williams, both hoping to knock off the favorite. U.S. Reps. Trent Kelly and Michael Guest mingled in the crowd.

Foster launches new TV ad for Governor

 

Taggart looks to take on drugs as AG

 

84th annual Delta Council held

 

WCBI – Democratic candidate for Commissioner of Agriculture makes stop in Tupelo

NEWSMS – Mississippians embrace alternative state flag

The Governor recently signed a bill to allow the Stennis Flag to be used on a specialty license plate. The proceeds of which go toward the Two Mississippi Museums. Stennis says the Mississippi Museum of History and the Civil Rights Museum have received over $8,500 in pre-orders alone. Others have already embraced the new flag and are already recognizing it as the state flag.

“It’s been a grassroots movement,” said Stennis. “People have put stickers on their cars, flags in front of their homes and their businesses, and it has taken off and grown like that partly because it is a great design, but also because of the positive spirit behind it and it allows us to release all of that negative tension and just rally around the fact that we love this state and we want to celebrate it in an evocative rather than a provocative way.”

DAILY LEADER – Mississippi city no longer provides worker health insurance

Employees of the Mississippi city of Lumberton have been working without employer-provided health insurance for about three months.

Mayor Quincy Rogers tells WDAM-TV that the insurance was cut was due to financial issues and saved the city about $140,000. The nature or cause of the financial issues is unclear. The station says workers were promised raises to help compensate them for paying out-of-pocket for insurance, but those raises haven’t appeared on any paychecks as of yet.

Wicker announces $33 million for Gulf Coast passenger rail

 

Presley: 5 telemarketers charged with 442 violations

 

Hyde-Smith launches new Senate website

 

DAILY LEADER – Mississippi town to decide whether to allow alcohol sales

Enough signatures have been gathered to call for a vote on whether to allow alcohol sales in a dry Mississippi town.

WCBI-TV reports a group called “Houston Forward” created a petition to add beer, wine and spirits to local restaurants and stores. Voters will decide whether to approve alcohol sales June 27.