DAILY JOURNAL – Reeves campaign sets up shop in Tupelo

Reeves in TupeloThe most well-funded candidate in the race to be Mississippi’s next governor flexed a little campaign muscle Friday and formally opened a dedicated field office in Tupelo.

Incumbent Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves spoke with local supporters and campaign volunteers Friday afternoon, emphasizing his record as presiding officer of the state Senate and promising more of the same if elected to Mississippi’s chief executive post.

Social policies continue to receive an especially strong accent in the lieutenant governor’s stump speech. On the campaign trail, Reeves, a Republican, has largely ignored his primary opponents and highlights the general election race against the Democrat nominee…



…“We’ve got two other people running as Republicans and they’re good people who have served our state well,” Reeves said. “You won’t hear me say anything negative about them.”

MBJ – Bill Crawford: Conservative Foster pushing for Medicaid reform

Successful DeSoto County small businessman Robert Foster is one of the more conservative members of the Mississippi Legislature, e.g. the American Conservative Union gave him a 95% “conservative” rating in 2018.

Serving his first term as a state representative, Foster decided not to seek re-election but put his name on the ballot for governor. He said his experience these four years is the reason…



…Relying on his lens as a small businessman he sees education too focused on university transfer while what we need is more skills training in high school and community college. He sees the tax structure out of kilter and proposes replacing income taxes with use taxes. He sees incarceration policies unbalanced between violent criminals and non-violent criminals with drug addictions and mental health problems.

And, he sees the need for Medicaid reform to cover more low-income working people.

His Medicaid position comes from his own hiring experience at his agri-tourism business. Cedar Hill Farms hires people to grow crops like pumpkins, gourds, and Christmas trees. It hires people to operate and perform in family friendly activities and events. It hires people to sell farm produce and other items to the 50,000 agri-tourists who show up for the activities and events. Some hires are full-time but many are seasonal.

Waller promotes comprehensive road program on Gallo Show

 

NEWSMS – Governor, Insurance Commissioner join lawsuits to expand health plans

Insurance Commissioner Mike Chaney has joined the state of Oklahoma in a lawsuit. The lawsuit supports the U.S. Department of Labor’s rule to expand Associated Health Plans which would give a cheaper alternative to consumers in Mississippi.

Chaney says Democrat-controlled states like California and New York are against expanding AHP’s because they are able to make money operating their own systems through the Affordable Care Act…

…Governor Bryant has also joined on with a separate Texas lawsuit dealing with AHP’s.

“I’m proud to sign onto this amicus brief,” said Governor Phil Bryant. “The Obama Administration made it difficult for small businesses to offer affordable healthcare coverage to their employees.  This Department of Labor rule promulgated by the Trump Administration involving Associated Health Plans will help to increase access to affordable health insurance for many Mississippians.”

WLOX – Congressman Steven Palazzo Interview

Congressman Steven Palazzo joins us to talk about several topics, including the push for a Federal Fisheries disaster declaration. That, of course, in response to the openings of the Bonnet Carre Spillway.

Click here for Part 1.

Click here for Part 2.

Congressman Guest talks disaster preparedness

 

HATTIESBURG AMERICAN – Lobbying. Gifts to officials. Transparency. Where to secretary of state candidates stand?

A file photo of former Hattiesburg Mayor Johnny DuPree.Four people are running this year to replace outgoing Mississippi Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann. Three responded to a request for comment on several transparency and accountability issues.

Each said they support transparency and accountability reforms — to varying degrees.

Here’s what they said…

…Johnny DuPree, the former mayor of Hattiesburg, is one of two Democrats running. He said he was open to reform, but would not go so far as to ban lobbyists from giving public officials a cup of coffee.

Sam Britton, the public service commissioner for Mississippi’s Southern District, is one of two Republicans running. Britton said he supports restrictions on gifts to lawmakers…

…Sen. Michael Watson, R-Pascagoula, is the other Republican candidate. Watson suggested increasing the frequency of lobbyist reports.

Smith releases video endorsements in Southern Transportation Commissioner race

 

Gov. Bryant, former US Sen. Lott supports Nic Lott for Central PSC

CLARION LEDGER – CPS chief Jess Dickinson: Foster care crisis ‘squarely on my shoulder.’ But money, time needed

DickinsonAs Commissioner of the Mississippi Department of Child Protection Services, responsibility for the operations of Mississippi’s lead child welfare agency falls squarely on my shoulders.

While I believe we at MDCPS have made significant improvement in our efforts to protect Mississippi’s at-risk, abused and neglected children and their families, I fully recognize that more needs to be done. But much of what needs to be done requires increased funding and more time.

Since I assumed my duties as Commissioner 20 months ago, MDCPS has worked hard to maintain children in their homes in cases where our professional staff and youth court judges believe it safely can be done. In those cases, we provide services to the family and we closely monitor the family’s progress, thereby avoiding the substantial trauma a child experiences from removal to foster care. And when removal into foster care has been unavoidable, we have worked hard to help the families solve the problems that led to removal, allowing us to reunite the children with their birth parents. We also have aggressively attacked the substantial backlog of cases involving children moving toward adoption.

NEWSMS – Rep. Thompson authors bill to protect churches from terrorism

The bipartisan legislation which protects churches and religious organizations from terrorist attacks. The bill was passed in the House and will ensure necessary Federal support to protect the safety of non-profits at risk of terrorism, including synagogues, mosques, churches, and other places of worship.

The bill, H.R. 2476, the Securing American Nonprofit Organizations Against Terrorism Act of 2019, was authored by Rep. Bennie G. Thompson (D-MS), Chairman of the Committee on Homeland Security, along with Reps. Peter King (R-NY), Max Rose (D-NY), Steve Stivers (R-OH), Bill Pascrell, Jr. (D-NJ), and Troy Balderson (R-OH).

“In just the first six months of 2019, the level of bloodshed in places of worship has shocked the world,” said Thompson. “It’s painfully clear that these houses of worship are under threat of violence committed by terrorists of all extreme ideologies. We urgently must address the root causes of hatred and extremism, but in the short-term, these synagogues, mosques, and churches need our help and protection just to stay safe. Nobody should feel threatened while praying, and I’m proud the House passed my bill to help give our communities the peace of mind they deserve.”

MBJ – PSC Commissioner Brown promotes 2 staff members

See the source imageCentral District Public Service Commissioner Cecil Brown has announced the promotions of two members of his staff: Alex Washington, Ph.D., to Deputy Commissioner and Tina Carter-Sawyer to Director of Consumer Services

WTOK – Listening session this week in search for Ole Miss Leader

The first session will be Thursday at University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson. The second will be Sept. 5 on the Oxford campus.

The Oxford Eagle reports that a 39-member search advisory committee of faculty, staff, students, alumni and community members met Friday in Oxford. The group, co-chaired by Oxford Mayor Robyn Tannehill and Associate Dean Charles Hussey, will provide feedback in the chancellor’s search. Some members will also take part in interviews with trustees.

Trustee Ford Dye of Oxford leads the search.